Old Documents

Recent Publications

 

25th Anniversary Reflections on The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church

Ed. by L. G. Bloomquist and J. Lamantia.

Theoforum 50.1 (2020)

17 articles that explore the Pontifical Biblical Commission's document.

Introduction to 25th Anniversary Reflections on The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church: The Culmination of a Prophetic Century Viewed 25 Years Later.


Theoforum  50.1 (2020): 5-21.

An overview of the document and the essays in the volume.

The legal art of Irnerius: The hermeneutics behind the medieval renaissance of Roman law 

Studia Canonica 54 (2020): 31-45.

The principal figure in the renaissance of Roman law in the late eleventh twelfth century was Irnerius of Bologna (ca. 1055 - ca. 1130). Transcending the legal debates of his day, Irnerius sought to clarify fundamental legal principles by using available exegetical tools on the Justinian Corpus. In doing so he established the groundwork for the philosophy and theology of law that developed during the twelfth century. This article highlights key elements of Irnerius’s method and provides example of his attention to legal principles of aequitas, iustitia, and ius.

Mark 14:51–52: A Sociorhetorical Reading of the Text and Conclusions Drawn from the History of Its Interpretation (with Michael A. G. Haykin), in Paul and Matthew Among Jews and Gentiles. Essays in Honour of Terence L. Donaldson, ed. Ronald Charles; Library of New Testament Studies; (London: T & T Clark Bloomsbury Publishing, 2021), 157-179.

In Mark 14:51-52 we read a seemingly inconsequential story of a young man, found in the garden at the same time as Jesus who is captured by Temple authorities. It is the only passage that is unique to Mark in the Passion account. If, in particular, Matthew was not alien to the language and themes found in Mark 14, why did he not include the story? In our presentation, we provide an answer to this question and thus help to understand both the Gospel of Mark and the other Gospels, including that of Matthew.